Keyframes & Animation in Cinema 4D

March 26, 2014 § Leave a comment

Thinking & Practice Tutorial 24/03/14

Screen Shot 2014-03-26 at 10.29.38 Screen Shot 2014-03-26 at 10.29.54 Screen Shot 2014-03-26 at 10.30.09 Screen Shot 2014-03-26 at 10.30.52

In this session we look at keyframes and Animation in Cinema 4D.

Firstly we selected an object and set the timeline to zero. On the z axis it shows move we made. Using command and selecting the orange dot next to the z axis turns it orange, showing the movement of the object. We went to mode > project and set the frames per second (FPS) to 25, the timeline to 100, frame Rate to 25 and the render settings to a width  of 960 X 540 much like you can in After Effects. Making sure we can see the ‘action safe’ option, we created a scene with a cube, sphere and a cone. We then added colour  by double clicking then double clicking again on the swatch, and made each shape a different colour. We also added a floor object. We could drag a colour to the objects and white to the floor, then animate each object individually.

To create looping animation, we selected the first frame and pressed control and dragged the frame to copy it onto last frame. This then creates a seamless follow on animation. We added rotation at 360 degrees to the cone, then moved the frame to the end. When playing the animation, Cinema 4D automatically has ease in and ease out (which you had to set up in After Effects). If you want to change this, go to Window > Timeline > Curve editor. Going into the drop down menus and opening these out, you can see the curve of the movement. You can alter the movement so that it is linear – the rotation then becomes constant and with the sphere it changes the type of movement you can alter each one separately.

We created a camera, went to the top of view port, dragged the camera into the null (which is create at 0,0,0) then rotated the null, which automatically rotates the camera around the scene. If you go into Window > Timeline again, you can see the null has a curve, so setting it to linear makes the rotation constant – it will loop continually. You can zoom out without affecting the animation.You can experiment by adding lights, different materials and textures.

 

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